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Race as a Social Construct: Serving the Needs of All Individuals

 

Race is a social construct that is broadly used to categorize people based on physical characteristics, behavioral patterns, and geographic location. Race is not a proxy for biology or genetics. Data regarding race is typically based on self-identification and data collection routinely allows respondents to select more than one race. Racial and ethnic groups that have historically faced discrimination are at a higher risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Ohio Department of Medicaid recognizes that social inequality, not genetic differences, produce these racial and ethnic health disparities. Examining health access, health care quality, and health outcome data by race and ethnicity allows the health system to assist in addressing the factors contributing to inequity and ensure that the health system serves the needs of all individuals. October 2021

For more information, please contact Melissa Nance, ODM Quality Improvement Section Chief (Melissa.Nance@medicaid.ohio.gov).


 

Sharing best practices to improve cardiovascular and diabetes health.

 
Founded in 2017, the mission of Cardi-OH is to improve cardiovascular and diabetes health outcomes and eliminate disparities in Ohio's Medicaid population.

 

 
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MOST RECENT

Updated USPSTF Recommendations Focus on Individualized Initiation of Aspirin for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

Updated recommendations from the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) support shared decision-making and selective initiation of aspirin for primary prevention in 40 to 59-year-old patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk of 10% or greater (Grade C recommendation). The net benefit of daily, low-dose aspirin use, including reduced risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, is small in patients ages 40 to 59, though it has a greater benefit for those with higher CVD risk. Risks include gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding.

READ MORE →

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What We Do

What We Do


Experts at Ohio's seven medical schools identify, produce, and disseminate the latest evidence-based cardiovascular and diabetes best practices.

 

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How We Do It


Utilize monthly newsletters and an online repository of resources at Cardi-OH.org, podcasts available on Cardi-OH Radio, and the Project ECHO® virtual training model.

Why We Do It

Why We Do It


To improve the health and well-being of all Ohioans.

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